Imperial HSDD Study

 

COVID-19 update: We are taking all necessary safety measures (PPE, sanitisation, social distancing where possible) to minimise any risk to our participants.

Role of the naturally occurring hormone kisspeptin in Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder

Are you worried and/or distressed about your low sexual desire?

 

 You could be suffering from Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder (HSDD).

At Imperial College London, we are investigating the effects of a naturally occurring hormone (called kisspeptin) on sexual and emotional brain function, in men and women with HSDD. 

 

HSDD is characterised by a lack of sexual desire, fantasies or thoughts, that is troublesome for an individual. It can have a significant impact on an individual's quality of life and can lead to stress, anxiety, sadness and problems with relationships. At the moment, there are limited treatment options available for this condition. Therefore, we need to develop a better understanding of how and why HSDD occurs, in order to develop future treatments.

If you are:
• Right-handed
• Heterosexual
• Aged over 18 years old
• In a relationship for at least 6 months

And are interested in taking part in our research study, please email to find out more information and see if you are eligible.

If you decide to take part, you will receive £200 in expenses.

 
 

More information

The study consists of an initial screening visit followed by  two weekday, 4-hour visits. You will receive an injection of a natural and safe hormone (called kisspeptin), give blood samples, answer some questionnaires, and have an MRI scan (no radiation).

 

To view or download a PDF copy of our participant information sheet, which has full details of the study, please click here.

If you have any further questions about the study, please contact us by email (addresses below) or using the contact form below.

 

Contact Us

For the male study, please email: imperial.maleHSDD@NHS.net

For the female study, please email: imperial.femaleHSDD@NHS.net

 

Or use the form below (either study)

I am:
 

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